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Mass Casualties
According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), bombs are used most frequently and accounted for nearly 70% of all terrorist attacks in the United States between 1980 and 2001.

It is important that you know your work, school and community disaster plans. You can ask your Local Emergency Planning Committee, Public Safety Department, school administrator or your supervisor for more information. Identify a hospital that is not the one closest to you. Hospitals that are closest to the incident are often the busiest.

What should I do if I think someone is going to set off a bomb?

At Home

At Work

At School

In Public

Leave the area immediately.

Follow existing evacuation guidelines.

Follow existing evacuation guidelines.

Leave the area immediately.

Call 9-1-1. Tell the operator what you saw or know (suspicious persons, packages, or vehicles).



Call 9-1-1. Tell the operator what you saw or know (suspicious persons, packages, or vehicles).

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from neighborhood leaders).

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from workplace supervisors).

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from school administrators).

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from community leaders).

Reference: CDC Website 1. U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Terrorism 1980-2001.

If you are in a bombing incident you should:

· Avoid crowds

· Avoid unattended vehicles

· Follow instructions carefully from police, fire, EMS, military personnel or your supervisor

· Call 911 if no emergency assistance has arrived

· Assist others who need help if you are able

When the explosion is over you should:

· Stay away from damaged buildings

· Avoid crowds because they could be a target for a second attack

· Listen to radio or television for further instructions

When Should I Seek Medical Treatment?

If you have:


· Dry mouth

· Vomiting or diarrhea

· Excessive bleeding

· Persistent cough

· Rash or burning skin

· Trouble breathing

· Trouble walking

· Blurred vision

· Hearing problems

· Headache


Remember that if you go to the hospital you may have to wait. Go to the hospital or clinic that is furthest away from the incident. The medical personnel will triage which means they will take worst first. If you do not have life threatening injuries you may be asked to wait. There will be limited information so be patient.

Resources:

American Red Cross can provide guidance to make plans for you and your family.

United States Department of Homeland Security

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